Read more about the article Wedding Violinist Cellist Ensemble Oakville
Wedding String Quartet GTA: Erin and Jamie at Airship 37

Wedding Violinist Cellist Ensemble Oakville

Wedding Violinist Cellist Ensemble Oakville. Introducing our award winning string duo, string trio and string quartet. Venue recommendations.

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Read more about the article Wedding String Ensemble Oakville: Kayla and Andrew
Toronto wedding Violinist at Enoch Turner Schoolhouse

Wedding String Ensemble Oakville: Kayla and Andrew

 

Spring is one of my favorite seasons, May in particular. Even nicer than all the flowers, the green grass, the birds singing, is a spring wedding ceremony, in a church on a warm day. There is just so much promise and excitement in a spring ceremony, and we are always happy to perform. Kayla and Andrew chose quite traditional music, which we always like as it just fits so perfectly. I particularly enjoy the combination of Bach Air with Pachelbel Canon, as the Bach Air has such a smoothness to the sound, which Pachelbel Canon is much more contrasting, and almost bursts forth with energy. The signing is paced slightly slower, as this gives the guests a chance to think about the couples marriage (and snap a few photos in some cases) while the bride and groom sign the marriage documents. Bach’s Jesu Joy is perfect for this as well. Lastly, as the couple is introduced for the first time, what is more appropriate than the Mendelssohn wedding March in a church, in May?

 

Bridesmaids: Bach Air

Bride: Pachelbel Canon

Signing: Bach: Jesu Joy

Recessional: Mendelssohn wedding March

 

Photographer and photo credit: Love you Madly

Wedding planner: Melissa Laphen from Great Events by Melissa

Venue: Walton Memorial United Church

 

Wedding ceremony musicians Oakville: Duo d’Amore-violin and cello duos, string trios and string quartets

 

 

 


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Continue ReadingWedding String Ensemble Oakville: Kayla and Andrew

Wedding Violinist Cellist Oakville: Amy and Matthew ceremony

 

Where do I start with the wedding? There are some ceremonies where there is one thing that stands out—perhaps the bride has an amazing dress, something funny or unexpected happens at the ceremony, the music is particularly beautiful, or the officiant does an especially fine job. This wedding, just it all the right notes, and the ceremony was at once beautiful and traditional, while at the same time had an unexpected twist that was lovely and special.  When I first spoke with Amy, the bride, she knew that she wanted to walk down the aisle to Elvis’ Can’t Help Falling in love, and were happy to oblige, as it is a beautiful song, and very well suited to the processional. As sometimes churches have issues with more modern music being performed during wedding ceremonies, I was glad to hear that the Church had no such issues, and we were given the go ahead to perform this song. Prior to the bridal processional, our string duo performed Bach’s Jesu Joy, which is a traditional song for weddings. I always like the bridal processional to be a bit more showy and elevated than the preceding song, as after all the processional is the brides moment, and the music should really reflect that. In this case the song was a perfect contrast. The signing music moved back to the classical spectrum with the wonderful and ‘cooling” Largo from the Four seasons by Vivaldi. The plucked strings of the cello are sound like a snowfall, while the violin part soars above, for a stunning effect. As the couple triumphantly walked down the aisle at St John’s United Church, we finished off the ceremony music with Handel’s second hornpipe from the Water music.

 

Bridesmaids: Bach Jesu Joy

Bride: Elvis: Can't Help Falling in Love

Signing: Vivaldi: Largo from the Four Seasons

Recessional: Handel: Hornpipe II from the Water Music

 

 

Wedding string musicians Oakville: Duo d’Amore-violin and cello duos, string trios and string quartets

 


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Continue ReadingWedding Violinist Cellist Oakville: Amy and Matthew ceremony